Get help from the best in academic writing.

Discussion Peer/Participation Prompt Due Sunday Construct a response to at least 2 of your peers commenting on the best

Discussion Peer/Participation Prompt Due Sunday
Construct a response to at least 2 of your peers commenting on the best practice strategies for use in shared decision making with a patient of the ethnic background your course colleague has shared their thoughts and experiences about.

For each colleague that you respond recommend an additional best practice for competent cultural engagement with the patient.

Responses need to address all components of the question, demonstrate critical thinking and analysis, and include peer reviewed journal evidence to support the student’s position.

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with in-text citations and corresponding references in APA format.

Please review the rubric to ensure that your response meets the criteria.

Estimated time to complete: 2 hours

PLEASE USE UPDATED REFERENCES I WILL PROVIDE BOTH PEERS POST

PEER#1

Unit 12 Discussion: Ethnicity and Culture

Video #2

I work at a cancer hospital in a small town in Zion, Illinois though very small our patients come from all over the United States and of all ethnicities and religious that I can think of. There have been many instances where our cultural competence knowledge and training has shown in our care and in the way patients are assigned to certain nurses. We pride ourselves in patient satisfaction and fully allow the patients to have a say in who takes care of them whether it be male or female or even if they didn’t get off on the right foot with a certain nurse/CNA.

An instance that has stayed with me happened a couple of years ago when a female Muslim patient was admitted to our unit post-surgery from an extensive tumor removal. When I was first introduced to her I remembered everything I had been taught and that I knew about a Muslim patients religious and cultural beliefs. She chose to have us place her hijab on immediately after surgery which we found important to do for her. In the room she had her husband and daughter with her. Though I knew a good amount about the Muslim religion I still asked her and her family if there was anything they’d like me to know about her practices. They seemed touched that I asked and told me about her Hijab, their daily praying, and a little more about their beliefs in healthcare. From an Islamic perspective, health is defined as a state of physical, psychological, social and spiritual wellbeing and is viewed as one of the greatest blessings God has bestowed on humankind. The world view of Muslim patients incorporates the notion of receiving illness and death with patience, meditation and prayers. Even non-practising Muslim patients generally call for spiritual or religious intervention when they are facing significant challenges (Contributor, 2019).

This was the first of many patients I encountered that practiced different religious beliefs than myself but I was raised to never judge and treat everyone with respect regardless of skin color, religion, or anything else. Being culturally competence should be expected of everyone but even more so for nurses. Cultural competence prepares nurses to empathize, relate more to patients, and attend more deeply to their needs. Hospital patients can often be agitated or stressed. Having someone on their care team who speaks their language or understands their unique background may help them to relax, leading to greater therapy and overall care (Attum, 2021). The information and statistics showing better patient outcomes for patients when their nurses are culturally competent is overwhelming and proven to be correct.

References

Attum B, Hafiz S, Malik A, et al. Cultural Competence in the Care of Muslim Patients and Their Families. [Updated 2021 Jul 7]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499933

Contributor, N. T. (2019b, August 4). Cultural competence in nursing Muslim patients. Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/cultural-competence-in-nursing-muslim-patients-30-03-2015/

ReplyReply to Comment
PEER#2

Fran Webb
WednesdayAug 4 at 10:35pm
I chose video #3 when I heard the young Black lady speak about the church group trying to convince her she was too young to be affected by high blood pressure. I wanted to speak about contraceptives too but will focus on blood pressure. I’ve heard similar comments regarding high blood pressure and age in low-income urban areas. High blood pressure within the Black population is rising. Genetic and environmental are contributing factors:

I was at a children’s event recently at an urban school, ratio was 98% Blacks, 2% Hispanic and non-healthy foods were offered such as assorted chips, Doritos, Hot Takis, and sodas. Parents reached for the same unhealthy products. Some children didn’t have the opportunity to play outside or exercise during COVID-19 crisis. Weight gain was noticeable at the event. Kids and teens are already struggling to learn outside the classroom during the pandemic, but lockdowns and quarantines are also making it hard for them to control their weight (Murez, 2019).

The younger a child is, the more likely it is that the high blood pressure is caused by a specific and identifiable medical condition and older children can develop high blood pressure for the same reasons adults do excess weight, poor nutrition, and lack of exercise (Mayo Clinic, 2021).

Genetic. Researchers have uncovered some facts that in the U.S, blacks respond differently to high blood pressure drugs than do other groups of people and are more sensitive to salt, which increases the risk of developing high blood pressure, environmental: Black people in the U.S are more likely to be overweight than blacks in other countries and some experts think that social and economic factors include discrimination and economic inequality are responsible for this difference however, discrimination and economic inequality is debatable (Beckerman, 2019).

As healthcare providers, we must be vigilant in educating our clients. It’s important is discuss healthy diet to parent and the young child. After determining SDH status, resources, take home materials are critical in defeating this chronic problem. Also, education, examples, and community support are positive avenues.

Beckerman, J. (September 6, 2019). High Blood Pressure in African Americans.

https://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/hypertension-in-african-americans (Links to an external site.)

Mayo Clinic (2021). High blood pressure in children

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure-in-children/symptoms-causes/syc-20373440

Murez, C. (March 22, 2019). Pandemic Has Many Kids Struggling with Weight Issues.

https://www.webmd.com/children/news/20210322/pandemic-has-many-kids-struggling-with-weight

Reply

Peer Response: Unit 4, Due Sunday by 11:59 pm CT Treatment of Hypothyroidism Instructions: Collaborative posts Read the SOAP

Peer Response: Unit 4, Due Sunday by 11:59 pm CT
Treatment of Hypothyroidism
Instructions:
Collaborative posts

Read the SOAP notes constructed by your course colleagues.
Review the ‘P’s posted by your peers from your advanced practice nursing role perspective – educator, leader or practitioner. From your advanced practice mindset reflect on a discussion you would like to have with two of your course colleagues about their ‘P’.
Post a response individually to each of them that expresses your advanced practice nursing role perspective of their ‘P’.
Use scholarly resources relevant to your advanced practice nursing role to support the key elements of the peer discussions you construct. [For example – if you are a nurse educator (clinical or academic) what are your thoughts about the patient education provided in the ‘P’, or do you want to comment on the fact that a peer put N/A for educational, etc.?’; if you a nurse leader what are your thoughts about the risk profile or cost effectiveness of the ‘P’, or adherence to the Patient Bill of Rights, etc.?; if you are a nurse practitioner did your peer develop a ‘P’ that aligns with EBP/CPG guidelines and/or the foundational basic sciences, etc.?

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

Estimated time to complete: 1 hour

USE UPDATED REFERENCES I WILL PROVIDE PEERS POST

PEER#1

Tiffany Johnson
SundayAug 1 at 11:32pm
Subjective (S): The patient is a 53-year-old white female. The patient came to the office today with complaints of feeling tired and unmotivated, 15 lb weight gain within the past year, and a TSH level of 93 completed at any lab test now. The patient states that she teaches yoga classes two to three times a week despite the weight gain and that she experienced signs and symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes and night sweats after her last period three years ago.

Objective (O): BP is 145/55, RR 16, Temp 97.2. The patient is 5’5″ tall and weighs 154 pounds. TSH level of 93. During the assessment, the patient denied pain and difficulty swallowing. Mild goiter felt during palpitation on the right side of the thyroid. The thyroid is larger on the right side than on the left. The patient skin felt dry and flaky on the extremities. During auscultation, the patients’ lungs are clear, and heart rhythm was regular, with no murmur or gallop noted. The slowness of relaxation of the Achilles tendon reflex was noted during the exam.

Assessment (A): Hypothyroidism

Plan (P):

Therapeutics: Hypothyroidism is a common condition of thyroid hormone deficiency, which is readily diagnosed and managed but potentially fatal in severe cases if untreated (Chaker, Bianco, Jonklaas,

Diabetes Management Instructions: Collaborative posts Read the SOAP notes constructed by your course colleagues. Review the ‘P’s posted by Essay

Diabetes Management
Instructions:
Collaborative posts

Read the SOAP notes constructed by your course colleagues.
Review the ‘P’s posted by your peers from your advanced practice nursing role perspective – educator, leader or practitioner. From your advanced practice mindset reflect on a discussion you would like to have with two of your course colleagues about their ‘P’.
Post a response individually to each of them that expresses your advanced practice nursing role perspective of their ‘P’.
Use scholarly resources relevant to your advanced practice nursing role to support the key elements of the peer discussions you construct. [For example – if you are a nurse educator (clinical or academic) what are your thoughts about the patient education provided in the ‘P’, or do you want to comment on the fact that a peer put N/A for educational, etc.?’; if you a nurse leader what are your thoughts about the risk profile or cost effectiveness of the ‘P’, or adherence to the Patient Bill of Rights, etc.?; if you are a nurse practitioner did your peer develop a ‘P’ that aligns with EBP/CPG guidelines and/or the foundational basic sciences, etc.?

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

Estimated time to complete: 1 hour
PLEASE USE UPDATED REFERENCES I WILL PROVIDE BOTH PEERS POST BELOW:

Nwakaego Ude
MondayAug 2 at 10:11pm

SUBJECTIVE

A 64-year-old Hispanic male was seen in the clinic for diabetic management. This morning he reports that his capillary blood sugar levels are in the 150 to 190 range. He claims to walk three to five miles three to five times a week. His daily carbohydrate consumption is between 75 and 100 grams. He takes metformin 1000mg BID and Glipizide 5mg daily. His most recent eye test revealed no issues, and he wears reading glasses as needed. He complains of a burning feeling in his feet on occasion.

OBJECTIVE: BP 118/72, P;72, R ;17, Height: 6’2, Weight: 200lbs, Hgb last month 7.4. Heart regular rhythm, without murmur or gallop, lungs are clear, monofilament testing does not reveal any decreased sensation to the feet.

ASSESSMENT

The first step is to check the patient’s blood sugar to discover what he is currently running. I will also ask the patient if there is any change in his diet, weight, and exercise level or if he has been sick recently that would have caused his blood sugar to be high. I would also check his feet and eyesight.

PLAN

Therapeutic.

I would discuss with the patient what might have triggered or made his blood sugar high. I would order an Hbg A1C, a CMP, a lipid panel, and a urine microalbumin/creatinine ratio (Toy et al., 2016) to check how the patient is managing his blood sugar and his lipid level. After discussing with the patient, if the rise in his blood sugar is not related to weight gain, exercise, or diet changes, I will consider adjusting his medication. If Glipizide and Metformin are not effective, more medication will be added. I would encourage the patient to continue metformin, since metformin is frequently the first medication used to treat diabetes, but if it does not work, adding another oral medication is the next step (Blaslov et al., 2018).

Education:

It is important to have a structured blood sugar testing approach throughout the day. Common times to test blood sugar are first when you wake up, before and after meals and exercise, and at bedtime. Educate the patient about lifestyle modifications like exercise, maintain a healthy weight, and eat healthy food. Increasing physical activity can help control blood sugar. Get at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise at least five days during the week (Powers et al., 2016). Moderate exercise is considered being able to talk but not be out of breath or able to sing out loud while exercising. For the best results, do both aerobic exercise and strength training throughout the week (Powers et al., 2016). Since exercise can lower blood sugar, it is important to keep fast-acting carbohydrates like candies, honey, glucagon, or cookies on hand in case he gets need to treat hypoglycemia. For diabetic neuropathy, I would educate him on the need for regular foot exams and wearing well-fitting shoes. I would also encourage the patient to take his medication as prescribed.

Consultation/Collaboration:

I would schedule a three-month follow-up visit for this patient to assess his HbA1C and evaluate how he is responding to the drug regimen. I would also refer the patient to a qualified diabetes educator or a registered dietician who can help the patient keep track of his carbohydrates.

References

Blaslov, K., Naran?a, F., Kruljac, I.,

Discussion Peer/Participation Prompt Due Sunday Construct a response to at least 2 of your peers commenting on the best

Discussion Peer/Participation Prompt Due Sunday
Construct a response to at least 2 of your peers commenting on the best practice strategies for use in shared decision making with a patient of the ethnic background your course colleague has shared their thoughts and experiences about.

For each colleague that you respond recommend an additional best practice for competent cultural engagement with the patient.

Responses need to address all components of the question, demonstrate critical thinking and analysis, and include peer reviewed journal evidence to support the student’s position.

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with in-text citations and corresponding references in APA format.

Please review the rubric to ensure that your response meets the criteria.

Estimated time to complete: 2 hours

PLEASE USE UPDATED REFERENCES I WILL PROVIDE BOTH PEERS POST

PEER#1

Unit 12 Discussion: Ethnicity and Culture

Video #2

I work at a cancer hospital in a small town in Zion, Illinois though very small our patients come from all over the United States and of all ethnicities and religious that I can think of. There have been many instances where our cultural competence knowledge and training has shown in our care and in the way patients are assigned to certain nurses. We pride ourselves in patient satisfaction and fully allow the patients to have a say in who takes care of them whether it be male or female or even if they didn’t get off on the right foot with a certain nurse/CNA.

An instance that has stayed with me happened a couple of years ago when a female Muslim patient was admitted to our unit post-surgery from an extensive tumor removal. When I was first introduced to her I remembered everything I had been taught and that I knew about a Muslim patients religious and cultural beliefs. She chose to have us place her hijab on immediately after surgery which we found important to do for her. In the room she had her husband and daughter with her. Though I knew a good amount about the Muslim religion I still asked her and her family if there was anything they’d like me to know about her practices. They seemed touched that I asked and told me about her Hijab, their daily praying, and a little more about their beliefs in healthcare. From an Islamic perspective, health is defined as a state of physical, psychological, social and spiritual wellbeing and is viewed as one of the greatest blessings God has bestowed on humankind. The world view of Muslim patients incorporates the notion of receiving illness and death with patience, meditation and prayers. Even non-practising Muslim patients generally call for spiritual or religious intervention when they are facing significant challenges (Contributor, 2019).

This was the first of many patients I encountered that practiced different religious beliefs than myself but I was raised to never judge and treat everyone with respect regardless of skin color, religion, or anything else. Being culturally competence should be expected of everyone but even more so for nurses. Cultural competence prepares nurses to empathize, relate more to patients, and attend more deeply to their needs. Hospital patients can often be agitated or stressed. Having someone on their care team who speaks their language or understands their unique background may help them to relax, leading to greater therapy and overall care (Attum, 2021). The information and statistics showing better patient outcomes for patients when their nurses are culturally competent is overwhelming and proven to be correct.

References

Attum B, Hafiz S, Malik A, et al. Cultural Competence in the Care of Muslim Patients and Their Families. [Updated 2021 Jul 7]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499933

Contributor, N. T. (2019b, August 4). Cultural competence in nursing Muslim patients. Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/cultural-competence-in-nursing-muslim-patients-30-03-2015/

ReplyReply to Comment
PEER#2

Fran Webb
WednesdayAug 4 at 10:35pm
I chose video #3 when I heard the young Black lady speak about the church group trying to convince her she was too young to be affected by high blood pressure. I wanted to speak about contraceptives too but will focus on blood pressure. I’ve heard similar comments regarding high blood pressure and age in low-income urban areas. High blood pressure within the Black population is rising. Genetic and environmental are contributing factors:

I was at a children’s event recently at an urban school, ratio was 98% Blacks, 2% Hispanic and non-healthy foods were offered such as assorted chips, Doritos, Hot Takis, and sodas. Parents reached for the same unhealthy products. Some children didn’t have the opportunity to play outside or exercise during COVID-19 crisis. Weight gain was noticeable at the event. Kids and teens are already struggling to learn outside the classroom during the pandemic, but lockdowns and quarantines are also making it hard for them to control their weight (Murez, 2019).

The younger a child is, the more likely it is that the high blood pressure is caused by a specific and identifiable medical condition and older children can develop high blood pressure for the same reasons adults do excess weight, poor nutrition, and lack of exercise (Mayo Clinic, 2021).

Genetic. Researchers have uncovered some facts that in the U.S, blacks respond differently to high blood pressure drugs than do other groups of people and are more sensitive to salt, which increases the risk of developing high blood pressure, environmental: Black people in the U.S are more likely to be overweight than blacks in other countries and some experts think that social and economic factors include discrimination and economic inequality are responsible for this difference however, discrimination and economic inequality is debatable (Beckerman, 2019).

As healthcare providers, we must be vigilant in educating our clients. It’s important is discuss healthy diet to parent and the young child. After determining SDH status, resources, take home materials are critical in defeating this chronic problem. Also, education, examples, and community support are positive avenues.

Beckerman, J. (September 6, 2019). High Blood Pressure in African Americans.

https://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/hypertension-in-african-americans (Links to an external site.)

Mayo Clinic (2021). High blood pressure in children

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure-in-children/symptoms-causes/syc-20373440

Murez, C. (March 22, 2019). Pandemic Has Many Kids Struggling with Weight Issues.

https://www.webmd.com/children/news/20210322/pandemic-has-many-kids-struggling-with-weight

Reply

Essay Writing at Proficient Essay

5.0 rating based on 10,001 ratings

Rated 4.9/5
10001 review

Review This Service




Rating: